Rolls-Royce launches hybrid flying car at Farnborough International Airshow

Rolls-Royce launches hybrid flying car at Farnborough International Airshow

Not long ago Uber reported on plans to launch its first flying car model. Now it was the turn of Rolls Royce, British carmaker famous for its luxury cars and also experienced in the production of aircraft turbine systems, to disclose its plans for the vehicle system by electricity, capable of performing vertical takeoff and landing – also known like EVTOL. The announcement was made at the Farnborough International Airshow 2018, aviation event that takes place between July 16 and 22 in the UK.

For electrical team chief Rob Watson: “Rolls-Royce is actively exploring a number of possible markets and applications for electric and hybrid flights. We are well positioned to play a leading role in the emerging world of personal air mobility and we will also seek to work collaboratively with a number of partners, “he said.

Rolls-Royce launches hybrid flying car at Farnborough International Airshow

Rolls-Royce launches hybrid flying car at Farnborough International Airshow

The vehicle, which will be capable of carrying up to five people, uses M250 gas turbine technology – the automaker’s most successful engine – built into the rear of the aircraft and modified as part of a hybrid electric propulsion system to generate enough electricity to feed six designed electric thrusters, especially to have a low noise profile, plus a battery for energy storage.

The project presented indicates that EVTOL – still without a baptismal name – must travel up to 800 km, with a speed of up to 400 km / h. In addition, as wings turn 90 degrees, the flying taxi will be able to take off or land vertically using the existing structure at airports and heliports.

The main objective of the company with this project is to adapt the vehicle not only as personal transportation, but also as taxi, public transport, logistics and even military application. The novelty is expected to hit the market as early as the early 2020s.

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